Letters & Endorsements

Letter to the Editor

Coursey will advocate for working families

Current state Rep. Tom Delnicki (14th District) says his work “has made a positive impact on the lives of South Windsor families and businesses.”

That’s not what his votes tell us.

Delnicki voted no for the $15 minimum wage that would help working families earn a living wage. He voted no for the Paid Family and Medical Leave Act that would help working families who need to care for sick family members. These initiatives are important for all of us and we should expect our state representative to support working families in South Windsor.

I am supporting Genevieve Coursey as our next state representative.

Coursey has made it clear she will be an advocate for legislation to help working families. This includes supporting their ability to earn a living wage and being able to care for sick family members without fear of losing their job. In addition, we should ask our representative to support access to affordable health care that will cover pre-existing conditions and offer real solutions for those homeowners going through the crisis of crumbling foundations. Coursey will be that strong leader for us on all these important issues.

Now is the time to bring change to South Windsor. Now is the time to support Coursey.

Andrew Paterna
South Windsor
The writer is mayor of South Windsor.

Published in the Journal Inquirer, October 8, 2020

Letter to the Editor

Delnicki vote on accountability is alarming

South Windsor State Rep. Tom Delnicki’s “no” vote on a police accountability bill is unacceptable.

HB 6004, which is now law, will make police officers more accountable for their actions and more effective at their jobs. It is alarming and frankly incomprehensible that Delnicki refuses to understand that in light of recent actions captured by film of police misconduct and cover-ups that have gripped our country in recent months.

This law requires officers to be trained in de-escalation methods, understanding implicit bias, behavioral health assessments and drug screenings, and it encourages minority recruitment. It increases independent oversight of deadly police shootings.

This law makes changes to police immunity from civil lawsuits when misconduct occurs. And it strengthens penalties for making a false police report based on race, gender, national origin, or sexual identity.

How, in good conscience, can Delnicki be against these basic provisions ,which studies have shown reduce police misconduct and improve police relations with minority communities?

This is not Delnicki’s first time opposing police accountability. He voted “no” on a police accountability and transparency bill last year. And at a recent town forum, Delnicki declared that “what happened to George Floyd should never happen again.” But his actions and votes in the General Assembly prove otherwise.

We can do better. South Windsor deserves better. On Nov. 3 let’s send a message through our vote that we value accountability, responsibility, and equality.

Damian Humphrey
South Windsor

Published in the Journal Inquirer, August 22, 2020

Letter to the Editor

Why didn’t Delnicki back sensible reforms?

The murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis and the police shooting of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta have rallied people across America. Many states, including Connecticut, are moving to bolster laws designed to prevent harmful actions by rogue officers.

Unfortunately, South Windsor’s Republican state Rep. Tom Delnicki does not seem to think this is necessary. During the General Assembly’s special session, he voted against the police accountability bill.

South Windsor residents know that most police officers, including our own, conduct themselves with honor. However, we have all seen the disturbing instances around the country where law enforcement’s actions violate the public trust and endanger innocent people.

Those officers who disregard their sacred duties must be held accountable. The bill, which is now law, requires reasonable professional requirements such as training in de-escalation and routine drug and psychological testing. It holds police accountable for misconduct or brutality and it bans chokeholds.

The bill the Connecticut legislature passed was modest, not directed at more radical goals such as eliminating or defunding police departments. Furthermore, many of its requirements have been adopted by many police departments around the state, including our own.

I believe most people in South Windsor were eager to see these sensible reforms enacted into law. Why not Delnicki?

Perhaps he was motivated to remain consistent with the man at the top of his party’s ticket, President Donald Trump. But is that what we want from our representative?

Mark Abrahamson
South Windsor

Published in the Journal Inquirer, August 24, 2020

Letter to the Editor

Coursey will support working families

I am concerned about my children’s and grandchildren’s future. While I am grateful my family has stayed healthy, their lives have been turned upside down by the COVID-19 pandemic. Young families have been especially hard hit by changes in the workplace, public education, and child care. Working families need support.

When the legislature goes back to work, we are going to need state lawmakers with innovative ideas who will stand up for average families. I don’t see evidence the legislator representing

South Windsor’s 14th House District is up for the job.

But I do see a leader in South Windsor’s Democratic candidate for state representative, Genevieve Coursey.

Coursey, the mother of three children, knows that while juggling a family, school and work is always tough, COVID-19 has made those responsibilities even more challenging. South Windsor needs a smart, hardworking legislator who will support families in the state’s effort to get back to normal.

This Election Day is important. I will be voting for Coursey on Nov. 3.

Linda Jeski
South Windsor

Published in the Journal Inquirer, October 1, 2020

Letter to the Editor

Trump should release returns if tax news is ‘fake’

The New York Times has obtained and is writing stories about President Donald Trump’s federal tax returns going back 15 years or so. The president says the information is “fake news.”

To prove that, all the president has to do is release his income tax returns, like all presidential candidates have done for decades, to show how they differ from what the Times has reported.

Trump’s own IRS commissioner says it’s perfectly acceptable for a taxpayer to publicly release his returns, even if they are under audit.

If the president thinks the published information about his returns isn’t true, releasing his returns is an easy way to disprove that. It’s simple. Otherwise, if he fails to release his returns, he is tacitly and implicitly saying the New York Times is right.

Hal Reed
South Windsor

Published in the Journal Inquirer, October 10, 2020